2nd World Trade Plane Fake?

  • The most obvious issue I have with those numbers is that for F=ma you’ve substituted the plane’s speed for its acceleration (or, in this case, deceleration). Consequently, you’re saying that the plane went from 450 mph to 0 mph in precisely 1 second.

    *Finds an envelope and a pencil*

    According to http://www.solcomhouse.com/Worldtradecenter.htm, the relevant floors should have been about 224 feet square (50,000 square feet). That’s about 68 metres in both dimensions.

    Given a fixed deceleration of 450 mph/s (201 m/s^2, to give it a more conventional unit) the plane (or its debris0 would have to have travelled just over 100 metres before coming to a stop. Even if it went diagonally across a floor of the tower, that’d put it out the far side.

    Consequently, your acceleration is too low. The force would be higher.

    However, you’ve not taken the impact area into account. 1 KSI is 1000 pounds per square inch; you need to divide the total force of the impact by the area it took place in. Given that planes are generally aerodynamic, the pressure exerted by the nose of the plane (which obviously would have a small area) must have been immense.

    I’d work it out, but I’m tired and I’ve got to go to my energy-sapping job shortly.

    Toodles..

  • The most obvious issue I have with those numbers is that for F=ma you’ve substituted the plane’s speed for its acceleration (or, in this case, deceleration). Consequently, you’re saying that the plane went from 450 mph to 0 mph in precisely 1 second.

    *Finds an envelope and a pencil*

    According to http://www.solcomhouse.com/Worldtradecenter.htm, the relevant floors should have been about 224 feet square (50,000 square feet). That’s about 68 metres in both dimensions.

    Given a fixed deceleration of 450 mph/s (201 m/s^2, to give it a more conventional unit) the plane (or its debris0 would have to have travelled just over 100 metres before coming to a stop. Even if it went diagonally across a floor of the tower, that’d put it out the far side.

    Consequently, your acceleration is too low. The force would be higher.

    However, you’ve not taken the impact area into account. 1 KSI is 1000 pounds per square inch; you need to divide the total force of the impact by the area it took place in. Given that planes are generally aerodynamic, the pressure exerted by the nose of the plane (which obviously would have a small area) must have been immense.

    I’d work it out, but I’m tired and I’ve got to go to my energy-sapping job shortly.

    Toodles..

  • Giz

    You see this is why I failed AS Physics really eh! Though I’m guessing you still agree that they’re talking out of their rears? I guess in the haze of battle I overlooked obvious points but I haven’t really done any maths or physics for along while for a damn good reason. However thanks for setting me straight on those points but as I said, it was never my strong point :)

  • Giz

    You see this is why I failed AS Physics really eh! Though I’m guessing you still agree that they’re talking out of their rears? I guess in the haze of battle I overlooked obvious points but I haven’t really done any maths or physics for along while for a damn good reason. However thanks for setting me straight on those points but as I said, it was never my strong point :)

  • Incidently, I don’t know if you ever saw the Short Change video? but there’s a good debunker’s guide at http://www.ccdominoes.com/lc/LooseChangeGuide.html.

  • Incidently, I don’t know if you ever saw the Short Change video? but there’s a good debunker’s guide at http://www.ccdominoes.com/lc/LooseChangeGuide.html.

  • Giz

    Yeh I saw that vid, cheers for the link tho :)

  • Giz

    Yeh I saw that vid, cheers for the link tho :)

%d bloggers like this: